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Living Without An iPhone (Yes, It’s Possible)

Living Without An iPhone (Yes, It’s Possible)

I want to be upfront with the fact that, although this may seem like an airing of grievances or a rant, I am fully aware of how lucky I am. I am typing on my own laptop, enrolled in my first-choice college with tuition paid for by my parents, living debt-free, and walking around healthy and able.  I could not be more thankful for the relatively easy life I have had.

With that being said, I do not have an iPhone. My explanations to my parents about why I need one have not yet gone as planned. So for now, my method of communication is a Pantech Hotshot. You, along with a majority of people, might not be familiar with this piece of technology. Yes, it is touch-screen. No, I do not have access to the Internet.

Pantech Hotshot

Clearly, Steve Jobs and Apple hit a jackpot. The Washington Post reported in August 2012, that since 2007, Apple had sold 85 million iPhones in the U.S. alone. With constant updates (cue iOS7 complaints or praises) and new models (cue laughs over the 5C), Apple still continues to feed the public with its products. The company managed to sell 37.4 million iPhones in just the first quarter of 2013.

In a society fueled by immediate communication, Instagram, tweets, constant access to Facebook, Snapchats, and readily accessible emails, a smart phone appears to be a necessity.

However, I am here to demonstrate that it IS possible to navigate through life without a smart phone in hand, as impossible as that may seem. For those of you who cannot remember, or imagine, what life is like without an iPhone, let me remind you.

Pros:

  1. I can drop my Pantech HotShot from 100 feet (approximately) watch the pieces fly every which way, proceed to pick up the battery, place it back in the phone, and continue about my day. Try doing that with your fancy iPhone. Even an OtterBox couldn’t save it. (I don’t know…can it? I wouldn’t test it if I were you.)
  2. I look hipster and alternative. I stay away from the mainstream. Apple didn’t con me into jumping on the bandwagon. (Right….?)
  3. If my purse gets stolen, and my non-smartphone happens to be in it, the joke is on the perp. The only personal information you could get from my cellular device is the song title I typed into my notepad so I wouldn’t forget it. (Which currently says “Walking in Memphis”—guess that song stood out to me at one point or another.)
  4. I AM SAVING MONEY. My parents told me I could get an iPhone if I paid for the phone itself, and the $90 a month for the data. LOL. I would literally have pennies left for alcohol, lattes, my necessary highlights, and any sort of social activity I wanted to participate in.
  5. My Pantech Hotshot is a conversation starter. “What is that?” “Is that a smart phone?”

Cons:

  1. I don’t have an iPhone.
  2. My biggest issue with living sans iPhone is GROUP MESSAGING. For those of you who do not know—PLEASE do not include my cellphone into the next group message. The texts come in like pictures- taking a while to download, and I am unable to reply to the group.
  3. If I get lost, I have to resort to the archaic forms of navigation: physical maps, street signs, and the occasional approaching a stranger.
  4. I constantly look like a tourist. When I want to take pictures, I have to resort to my bulky Canon digital camera, or to the dismay of whoever I am with, I whip out my iPad mini. Come on, I needed some way to experience the world of Instagram.
  5. If I don’t have WiFi for my iPad Mini or my laptop, I don’t have access to email or the Internet in general. For some that could seem like a pro, but as a 20-something college student applying for jobs, it’s a little inconvenient.

I know (hope?) that one day this post will end up being somewhat hypocritical. I’m sure I will break down on the acquisition of my first real-world paycheck, and hand over the $199.99 for the device and the horrendously expensive monthly bill. In the mean time, I’ll continue to Instagram, Snapchat, iMessage, tweet, and FaceTime from my iPad Mini.

Lydia Mansel
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