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6 Daily Email Newsletters You Should Be Reading

6 Daily Email Newsletters You Should Be Reading

Each morning I come into the office begins exactly the same: I switch on my desk lamp, power up the computer, run to the break room for some coffee, and then read my daily emails. I get six each day, and while that may seem like a lot, once you get into the hang of reading them consistently, you’ll miss them if you have an early morning meeting and can’t to your computer till later. So head on to their websites, add your name to the newsletter list, and get ready to get some education every morning delivered straight to your inbox.

1. The Skimm

theskimm

This is probably everyone’s favorite news email. It’s concise, simple, and brief, and their pop culture references are on point. If you’re not getting any other daily emails, you should be getting this one. It’s important to be able to understand references to current news happenings and be able to at least have enough knowledge to participate in an intelligent conversation. Plus, the Skimm also makes individual postings called Skimm Guides explaining things like major political conflicts, the history of turbulent international areas, and campaign finance so you can be even more in-the-know about what’s going on in the wide world.

2. Poem-a-Day by POETS.org

poem-a-day

Poem-a-Day is a simple email that, on weekdays, sends you one new, previously unpublished poem by modern poets along with commentary on the piece from the poets themselves. On weekends, the email highlights classic poems. Join one of the 300,000-plus readers and get some culture in your inbox every day. I’ve found some of my favorite poems on here; maybe you will, too.

3. The Writer’s Almanac

writers almanac logo

Every day, the Writer’s Almanac with Garrison Keillor will send you a poem and a short list of concisely explained events in literary history. Unlike the Poem-a-Day, the Writer’s Almanac doesn’t focus on one particular type of poem at any given point. You’ll find Keats alongside Mary Oliver and Jonathan Stroud. Keep up with major events in book history (like Ray Bradbury’s birthday!) and learn more about the stories within some of your favorite stories.

4. CNN Politics’ Nightcap

nightcap

This daily email is clutch considering the current political landscape; the playing field is ugly, complicated, and busy, and it’s hard to find time to sort through it all. This email hits your inbox nightly (I read it the next morning) and is compiled by CNN reporters. It’s kind of like the Skimm, but with pictures, tweets, and links to CNN’s full coverage of happenings. Stay on top of this politics season and subscribe near the bottom of the CNN Politics page.

See Also

5. “Dilbert” Daily Strip

dilbert

I might have been the only kid growing up reading “Dilbert,” but I like to think I wasn’t. Keep up with the in-office shenanigans of engineer Dilbert and his micromanaged office life and crazy co-workers. If you work in an office, there’s a high likelihood you’ll relate to “Dilbert” cartoons on a spiritual level, and you’ll be a hit with your co-workers if you share the funny ones you find (or rather, the funny ones that are emailed to you). This is a super easy read (takes 15 seconds) but will get your morning started with a laugh.

6. BuzzFeed Dogs

buzzfeed

Do I really need to explain this to you? It’s dogs, puppies, and the like delivered to your inbox every day without fail. Cuteness abounds. How can you say no to that?

Haley

Haley is a writer and editor based in Birmingham, Alabama, who specializes in narrative nonfiction. She began writing at age 16 after enrolling in her North Alabama high school's newspaper class. She later studied journalism and history at the University of Alabama. In her spare time, she prepares for her eventual sorting into Slytherin House, has frequent chats with her bust of Abraham Lincoln, and feeds an inordinate amount of lettuce to her pet bunny, Ray Bradbury. To contact her, please shout into the nearest void or talk loudly about Jason Isbell’s discography.
Haley
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