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How To Create the Perfect Winter Flower Arrangement

How To Create the Perfect Winter Flower Arrangement

There’s something special about entering a room in late spring or summer and inhaling the scent of freshly cut flowers. I’ve always found that a cool, tiled kitchen counter seems naked without a vase full of bright yellow sunflowers, dahlias, or daffodils to remind one of the warmth outside. Even the simplest bouquet can brighten dull spaces and freshen up a room, and it’s hard to resist picking or purchasing a few flowers when they’re in full bloom during the warmer months.

Most of us, however, store away any notions of floral décor along with our inflatable pools and sundresses as we brace ourselves for the bitter cold of late autumn and winter. Our creativity seems to become dormant along with the contents of our gardens and it’s not until well after the last snow has melted that we dust off our favorite vases in anticipation of the first buds of spring.

But, darlings, don’t wait until May to fill your homes with floral whimsy. A variety of flowers and berries grow in colder temperatures and can look just as lovely as those summer sunflowers. The subdued colors of winter flora are reminiscent of the latest snowfall and prove beautiful additions to cozy kitchens and living rooms alike. Here’s a list of some of our favorite natural decorations to display individually or together in an elegant winter arrangement.

Amaryllis

First thing’s first, amaryllis (sorry I just had to). Though smaller than poinsettias, this vibrant flower can be just as effective in visually warming up an otherwise colorless room. The amaryllis plant can flower in temperatures as low as 10°F making it a winter favorite.

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Anemone

This simple but sizable perennial looks great in a bouquet or alone in a small vase. The soft, white petals and the elegant detail of the navy pistils make it a beautifully subtle addition to any room. While white is the most common color of anemones, they also grow in more vibrant hues such as scarlet, pink, purple, and blue.

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Tallow-berry branches

Similar to furry pussy willow buds, tallow-berry branches have a soft, rustic feel. Alone they serve as a simple decoration atop wooden shelves or ceramic containers, but weave these branches into wreaths or larger flower arrangements to introduce a unique texture to any natural assortment.

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Privet berries

This plant bears white flowers in the summer followed by dark purple berries in autumn and winter. Small but plentiful, a cluster of privet berries can be the perfect accent to offset less colorful displays. Insert a few sprigs into a snow white bouquet or display in earth-toned containers.

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Dusty Miller

The soft, green leaves of a dusty miller plant create a snow-kissed illusion in bouquets and solo arrangements. Although perhaps underwhelming on its own, dusty miller looks beautiful when juxtaposed with white flowers or others of muted colors.

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White roses

Although red roses are the natural go-to (especially with Valentine’s Day just around the corner), their colorless counterparts are ideal for winter weddings or larger centerpieces. The natural fullness of roses makes them well-suited to stand alone, but adding some colored accents like winter citrus fruit or those privet berries can make for an impressive bouquet.

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Want to do more? If you’re looking to create bigger and fuller arrangements, here are a few combinations of the aforementioned flowers and branches for inspiration.

See Also

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Includes white roses, anemone, privet berries, tallow-berry branches, and dusty miller

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Includes white roses, privet berries, and dusty miller.

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Includes white roses, white amaryllis, and privet berries (with kumquat and ranunculus).

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Includes pink amaryllis, white roses, and dusty miller (with peonies and white hydrangeas).

 

What are your favorite winter flowers to use in arrangements? Tweet us @litdarling!

Julia

Social Media Intern at Literally, Darling
Julia has spent the majority of her life in beautiful Virginia, although her slight accent suggests she spent more than her first four years in New York. She's a student at a public University where she supplements the in-state break in tuition with far too many trips to downtown restaurants and bookstores. A recovering "Friends" addict, Julia prefers intimate nights with Ben and Jerry over mundane collegiate activities like studying or barhopping. She's got a sweet tooth for writing and when she's not scribbling on every scrap of paper available, you'll find her questioning her own wardrobe or building a tolerance for classical music. At the moment, she's writing her first autobiography and mustering up the courage to go skydiving. Seriously.
Julia
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